Lawsuits to reveal extent of non-citizen voter registration in Virginia

A pair of lawsuits result in “positive steps toward quantifying the true extent of noncitizen voter registration in Virginia:”

 

The election integrity law firm that already uncovered more than a thousand non-citizens who had registered to vote and cast nearly 200 illegal ballots in just eight Virginia jurisdictions has successfully concluded lawsuits to access the voter registration data of two more localities in the state.

 

The Public Interest Legal Foundation agreed to dismiss lawsuits filed against the city of Manassas and Chesterfield County, Virginia for refusing to allow inspection of their voter roll records, after both jurisdictions agreed to provide data on total numbers of non-citizens registered to vote.

“This is a big win for private citizens working to keep their local governments transparent and accountable. Answers to questions like ‘how many non-U.S. citizens registered in my county last year?’ should never be forbidden,” Churchwell told the Washington Free Beacon. “In wrapping these cases, the remainder of the Commonwealth is on notice that it cannot hide these data from the public. They might as well start printing cancellation reports with non-citizens found on their rolls now.”

The job of enforcing the National Voter Registration Act’s list maintenance requirements was intentionally left undone by the Obama administration’s Justice Department, leaving it to private citizens and groups to demand transparency and accountability from local election officials. But under a new administration that has already expressed interest in reviewing the nation’s voter rolls and the extent of illegal voting that inaccurate voter lists may be allowing, that may well change.

“Looking at the larger picture, these cases show a way forward for the Trump Administration to study and quantify the true scope of illegal voting in 2016 and generally. Only the federal government has the tools and legal powers to compare our nation’s voter files to immigration databases. All the information is in the DOJ’s hands—if only it will take charge. PILF was forced to fill a gap that the Obama DOJ left with respect to asking these tough questions—but it can get back to that work again.”