“Some States Have No Interest in Fighting Voter Fraud”

Could it be that they fear the data would refute their claims?

 

What’s really behind some states’ absurd opposition to requests from the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity for publicly available voter roll data?

 

States certainly have no valid legal or “privacy” objection to letting the commission have the same data they routinely make available to political campaigns – or to any individual who requests it.  Forty-two states, including some like Maryland and Virginia that say they’ll refuse the commission’s request, also regularly share their voter roll data with one or both voter registration crosscheck programs.

 

Maybe it’s partisan opposition to President Trump. Certainly there’s a lack of interest in deterring voter fraud among those who continue to deny it exists — despite evidence to the contrary. Could it also be that some state officials fear the data would refute their denials and expose the sloppy condition of their voter rolls?

Voter registration rolls in some states are in sad shape. They are filled with large numbers of individuals who are ineligible to vote because they are dead, have moved away and registered in a different state, or are not U.S. citizens.

 

Such inaccuracies can be exploited by fraudsters who would rather cheat to achieve their political objectives, knowing that many states have lax procedures that make it extremely likely that they can commit voter fraud and get away with it.

 

This is not just a crime against our electoral system, but against American citizens. Every fraudulent ballot that is cast negates the vote of a legitimate voter, effectively disenfranchising that voter.

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