Non-citizen who illegally voted in Kansas three times pleads guilty to voter fraud

Yes, non-citizens do illegally register and vote – often more than once – and are usually only caught by chance.

 

That was the case with Victor David Garcia Bebek, who pleaded guilty to voter fraud for illegally voting in three Kansas elections while a citizen of Peru. He was caught after he registered to vote again at his naturalization ceremony.

 

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach – whose law requiring Kansans to provide proof of citizenship when registering to vote has been blocked by a federal judge – obtained Bebek’s conviction using his authority to prosecute voter fraud cases. Kobach is the only Secretary of State in the country with that authority.

Kobach found that Bebek illegally voted three times: in a 2012 special election and the 2012 and 2014 general elections. He was a Peruvian national at the time who voted in Sedgwick County, according to Kobach.

 

Kobach said the way the case was discovered because Bebek became a U.S. citizen earlier this year. At his naturalization ceremony, he was offered the chance to register to vote in Sedgwick County.

 

“This gentleman did so, and then when the Sedgwick County election office went back to the office to enter his information, they found that he had been on the voter rolls since 2011,” Kobach said.

Once again, a check box and the honor system failed to keep an ineligible non-citizen from casting illegal votes.

“Virtually no one” kept from voting by Texas’ voter ID law

An actual lack of a state approved photo ID kept virtually no one from turning out to vote in 2016.

 

Photo voter ID requirements don’t prevent eligible voters from voting. That’s the unsurprising (to anyone who pays attention to such things) result of a study of voter participation in two Texas battlegrounds in the 2016 general election.

 

The Texas Voter ID Law and the 2016 Election: A Study of Harris County and Congressional District 23, out of the University of Houston Hobby School of Public Affairs, found that non-voters in the two jurisdictions had the required photo voter ID – most stayed away from the polls because they just didn’t like the candidates.

Virtually all registered voters in Harris County and CD-23 who did not participate in the November 2016 election possessed one of the state approved forms of photo ID needed to cast a vote in person. . . . when pressed to give the principal reason why they did not cast a ballot in 2016, only 1.5% and 0.5% of non-voters in Harris County and CD-23 identified a lack of a state-approved photo ID as the principal reason they did not vote.

 

Among this handful of non-voters, 86% actually possessed an approved form of photo ID, while 14% did not. While the photo ID law at least partially discouraged some people from voting, an actual lack of a state approved photo ID kept virtually no one (only one non-voter among the 819 surveyed) from turning out to vote in 2016.

Any eligible Texas voters without an accepted form of photo ID were able to vote in that election by signing a reasonable impediment declaration and showing non-photo identification, a temporary remedy imposed by the courts that the Texas Legislature is working to make a permanent part of the law this session.

“Terry McAuliffe — Virginia’s Voter-Fraud Guru”

Voter fraud is happening in Virginia – from non-citizens registering and voting to mail ballot fraud to vote buying – but the state’s Democrat governor doesn’t want to do anything to stop it.

Virginia governor Terry McAuliffe, the former head of the Democratic National Committee, is at it again, vetoing six bills aimed at preventing voter fraud and illegal voting. What does he have against election integrity? Why does he want to make it easier to commit fraud and harder for election officials to detect or deter it?

McAuliffe hasn’t just vetoed every election integrity bill passed in the current legislative session.

In 2015 he vetoed House Bill 1315, which would have required county jury commissioners to send general registrars information on individuals who were disqualified to serve as jurors because they were not U.S. citizens, were no longer residents of Virginia, had been convicted of a felony, or had been adjudicated as incapacitated. There was no reason to veto this bill unless the governor wanted to make it easy for ineligible voters to continue to vote illegally and not get caught.

 

Why has Governor McAuliffe vetoed every reasonable effort to ensure honest and fair elections in Virginia? Well, the overwhelming number of felons vote for Democrats. Non-citizens also favor Democrats over Republicans. Could it be that the governor believes that illegal voting benefits his political party?

Could it be anything else?

Illegal Alien Charged With Voter Fraud

Another non-citizen caught illegally registering and voting:

A Nigerian citizen was indicted by a federal grand jury Wednesday for allegedly illegally reentering the U.S. after being deported and subsequently committing both tax and voter fraud. The federal indictment says that Kevin Kunlay Williams voted in both the 2012 and 2016 presidential elections. Williams was deported from the U.S. in 1995…

It seems Williams pulled off his voter fraud the same way other aliens who illegally register and vote do, by simply claiming to be a citizen.

According to the indictment, in 1999, Williams illegally returned to the United States from Nigeria using the last name Williams. In 2012, Williams allegedly registered to vote in federal, state and local elections by falsely claiming that he was a U.S. citizen and is alleged to have voted in the 2012 and 2016 presidential elections.

The honor system isn’t working to keep non-citizens off the voter rolls.

 

Arkansas governor signs voter ID bill into law

Arkansas has enacted a new, improved voter ID law:

Under the new law, a voter who does not show photo ID at his or her polling place may cast a provisional ballot. The voter will be given the option of signing a sworn statement that the voter is who he or she claims to be, and if that option is chosen the county clerk will compare the signature to the signature on the voter registration card issued to that person to see if they match and the ballot should be counted.

 

Alternatively, a voter casting a provisional ballot may choose to show photo ID to the county clerk or county election board before noon on the Monday after the election to have the ballot counted.

 

The law also requires that a copy of a voter’s photo ID be submitted with an absentee ballot. It allows an absentee voter to sign a statement that could be used to verify the person’s identity if no photo ID is submitted.

 

The Arkansas Secretary of State’s Office would be required to provide for the issuance of voter identification cards with photos to registered voters who request them from their county clerk. The cards would be issued free of charge.

This is a model other states should follow: affidavit voters given provisional ballots that are verified before being counted, an ID requirement for mail ballots, and free photo IDs for voters who need them.

Alabama lawmakers must address voter fraud

These are stunning incidents that impugn the credibility of the electoral process in our state.

 

Another case of voter fraud in Houston County, Alabama leads the Dothan Eagle to call for legislation to address the problem:

Last week, the mayor of a small Houston County town was arrested on charges of absentee voter fraud. Elbert Melton, 69, of Gordon, was charged with three counts, and was booked into the Houston County Jail. . . . Ironically, the three absentee ballots in question don’t change the outcome of the election, in which Melton, with 99 votes, defeated opponent Priscilla Wilson, who had 83 votes.

Voter fraud did change the outcome of a 2013 Dothan city election in which incumbent Dothan City Commissioner Amos Newsome edged out a challenger by just 14 votes – votes that turned out to be fraudulent.

Four of his campaign workers have either pleaded guilty or been found guilty of absentee voter fraud involving more than enough ballots to change the result of the election. However, Newsome has not been charged in the matter, and continues to serve on the Dothan City Commission.

 

These are stunning incidents that impugn the credibility of the electoral process in our state, and even the Secretary of State, John Merrill, has expressed frustration with the lack of statutory authority to ensure our election results are valid and enforceable.

West Virginia Legislature Proposes Photo Voter ID, End to Automatic Voter Registration

“Photo identification is necessary in order to ensure legitimacy in our elections.” 

 

Add West Virginia to the list of states considering commonsense legislation to make elections more secure.

 

HB 2781 requires photo voter identification, allows voters without an accepted photo ID to sign an affidavit and vote a provisional ballot that will be counted if the signature is verified by election officials, and ends the state’s automatic voter registration of driver’s license applicants.

 

Under this bill, voters will present one of the forms of ID to a poll clerk, and the clerk will verify that the name on the ID matches the name on the voter registration card.

 

Delegate Saira Blair, R-Berkeley, the bill’s lead sponsor, said the law would put West Virginia more in line with other states.

The bill includes exceptions for voters living in state licensed care facilities and those with religious objections to being photographed, as well as provisions for providing free photo voter ID cards.

 

HB 2781 also authorizes West Virginia’s Division of Motor Vehicles to share the U.S. citizenship status of voluntarily-registering license applicants with the Secretary of State, who will forward the information to county clerks to help keep non-citizens off the state’s voter rolls.

 

‘No definitive relationship’ between voter ID and turnout

Remember all those headlines last month touting a study that “proved” voter ID laws are racist and suppress minority voter turnout? They were wrong:

A new study by professors from Yale, Stanford, and the University of Pennsylvania challenges the notion that voter ID laws disproportionately affect minorities.

 

The new study finds “no definitive relationship” between tough laws requiring voters to present identification and a dropoff in Hispanic, black, and other minority turnout.

 

The study comes as a response to another one, published and widely reported in January, that asserted states with voter ID laws drive down turnout on Election Day, particularly among Hispanics. That earlier study, conducted by professors from the University of San Diego and Bucknell University, often is cited by liberal opponents of voter ID laws.

How did the earlier work of Hajnal, Lajevardi, and Nielson get it so wrong? From the new study by Grimmer et al:

Here, we show that the results of this paper are a product of large data inaccuracies, that the evidence does not support the stated conclusion, and that model specifications produce highly variable results. When errors in the analysis are corrected, one can recover positive, negative, or null estimates of the effect of voter ID laws on turnout. Our findings underscore that no definitive relationship between strict voter ID laws and turnout can be established from the validated CCES data.

Ex-Ohio Organizing Collaborative Employee Jailed for Felony Voter Registration Fraud

Rebecca Hammonds was sentenced to six months in jail after pleading guilty to 14 felony counts of fraudulently registering people to vote and forging signatures on voter registration forms while working for a left-wing group in Ohio.

Hammonds was a paid canvasser for the Ohio Organizing Collaborative (OOC), a liberal activist group that was active in registering voters in the southern part of the county during September and October 2015, when the voter registration fraud occurred. In October of that year, the county elections board director contacted the sheriff’s office after his staff began finding discrepancies in voter registration applications filed by OOC, including five submitted in the name of dead people.

Hammonds was originally charged with 35 felony counts but pleaded down to just 14. The judge declined her request for probation, “saying voter registration fraud is a serious crime that deserves some incarceration.”